Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 Page 149 Page 150 Page 151 Page 152 Page 153 Page 154 Page 155 Page 156 Page 157 Page 158 Page 159 Page 160 Page 161 Page 162 Page 163 Page 164 Page 165 Page 166 Page 167 Page 168 Page 169 Page 170 Page 171Nairobi, Dar–es–Salaam and Kampala are challenging and overcoming those barriers. Digitaltechnologies,onceprohibitively expensiveandonlyusablebyexperts,now aremorereadilyaccessible.Forexample, UN–Habitat,workingwithgroupssuchas OpenStreetMapandtheInternationalCenter forSustainableCities(ICSC),hasbeenableto providecheapandaffordableaccesstothese technologiesforyouth–ledgroupsinthethree EastAfricancitieswherethecommunity mappingprojectisbeingpiloted. Youngpeopleareinthevanguardof bridgingthedigitaldivideinAfrica;notonly takingupnewtechnologies,butdeveloping newusesforthem.Itisimportantthatall levelsofgovernmentsupportyouthandyouth agenciesindevelopingnewtoolstoanswer theirneeds,andthoseofthecommunities theylivewithin.Programmessuchasthe UN–HabitatUrbanYouthFundarean excellentexampleofhowyoungpeoplecan besupportedintheirwork.Alsotheycanuse thesenewtechnologiestohelpgovernments withpost–disastermanagement;forexample usingmappingtoplannewcommunities. ‘Young people want to be positive change agents in their communities,’ said Bisanju. ‘We are partnering with local and national governments, NGOs and international agencies such as UN–Habitat to help make this happen. It is not only money we are looking for, but acceptance and respect for our capabilities, ingenuity and passion.’ Governmentsofwar–tornareas,forexample Sudan,alsoarebeginningtoemployinnovative technologiesastheybeginthelongprocessof rebuildingtheircountries.Germany’sGAF, oneoftheleadingEuropeanprovidersofearth observationandgeo–informationsolutions, hasbeenawardedacontractbytheDarfur LandCommission(DLC)toestablishaNatural ResourcesandLandUseDatabaseandMapfor thewholeofDarfur. The project objective is to establish a multi–layered and dynamic land and natural resources information system to help enable decision makers to plan and manage Darfur’s future development. ‘Such an unprecedented project will no doubt be seen as revolutionary throughout the whole of Sudan; as a unique example which could be replicated in other parts of the country’, said Darfur Land Commission president Adam Abdel Rahman Ahmed. ‘When the project has reached a successful end, DLC expects to play a great role in maintaining sustainable development and peace in the region, leading to solving major problems with regards to natural resources and land use.’ The Natural Resources and Land Use Database and Map for Darfur project aims to increase the government’s long– term institutional and technical capacity to manage Darfur’s natural resources, including agricultural land, natural areas, forests, minerals, water, cities, towns and villages. This will establish a basis for poverty reduction and rural economic renewal in selected areas of the country, via development of non–farm and farm income. The database will help decision makers and policy analysts to establish plans for agricultural development and Top left: Nairobi’s Kibera slum. (Chrissy Olson/Flickr) Top right: Satellite mapping of a community in Dar–es–Salaam, Tanzania. (Richard Sliuzas) Bottom left: Digging a water trench in Kisi, Kenya (UN–Habitat). Bottom centre: Road puddles in the Keko Mwanga neighbourhood of Dar–es– Salaam. (Richard Sliuzas) Bottom right: Satellite mapping of the Katanga precinct in Kampala. (Richard Sliuzas) 124 home REGIONAL SOLUTIONS AFRICA